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Montgomery Councilmembers Katz, Leventhal and Navarro to host Honduran students on Friday, May 13

For Immediate Release: Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Montgomery County Councilmembers

Sidney Katz, George Leventhal and

Nancy Navarro to host Honduran students

On Friday, May 13, meeting in Rockville will be part of joint program of

Georgetown University’s Center for Intercultural Education

and Development and U.S Embassy in Honduras

 

ROCKVILLE, Md., May 11, 2016—Montgomery County Councilmembers Sidney Katz, George Leventhal and Nancy Navarro from 10-11 a.m. on Friday, May 13, will host several students from Georgetown University’s Center for Intercultural Education and Development at the Council Office Building in Rockville. The visit is part of a cultural exchange for students of the Access Microscholarship English Language (Access) Program sponsored by the U.S Embassy in Honduras.

 

This program provides two years of English language instruction to talented students ages 16-20 from disadvantaged communities in Honduras.

 

Students in the Access program have the opportunity to learn about American culture and democratic values. The Council visit is part of the program’s one- week visit to Washington, D.C., and is focused on U.S. civics and voluntarism. The time spent with the Councilmembers will complement the students’ exposure to the federal government and provide them with the opportunity to learn about the functions and operations of local government.    

 

“My colleagues and I are honored to host these extraordinary young people, who are taking the initiative to learn more about the American system of government—including how we do things here in one of the nation’s most diverse counties,” said Councilmember Katz. “Even as some of the current political rhetoric has grown more and more divisive, the Access Program is a shining example of our true colors as Americans: open, welcoming and genuinely interested in sharing our culture and celebrating our form of government.  I am so pleased to welcome our visitors from Honduras, and I look forward to learning from each of them as well.”

 

Councilmember Leventhal said “Montgomery County’s diversity is its strength. I believe that the Access Program provides us with an exciting opportunity to learn about the things that make us similar and to appreciate the things that differentiate us.”

 

Councilmember Navarro, who serves on the President’s Commission on Education Excellence for Hispanics, said: “Cultural exchanges are an essential way for us to understand international issues, but they also provide us with greater insight into the issues that our families face right here at home. According to our Planning Department, nearly 193,000 County residents identify themselves as Hispanic, and more than 9,000 of our residents are from Honduras. My hope is that this week-long visit will help motivate some of these students to pursue careers in public service.”

 

Jorge Abeledo, a program manager for the Center for Intercultural Education and Development at Georgetown, said the visit with Montgomery Councilmembers will help the students in their goal to study U.S. governments and bring some of what they learn back home.

 

“Meeting with Montgomery County Councilmembers will give the students the chance to learn about American culture and society at the ground level of the political system where change is effected,” he said. “This visit will give the students an experience that they can take back home to Honduras to have an impact in their communities.”

 

Other stops in Montgomery County for the Access students include a community volunteer experience at the non-profit A Wider Circle in Silver Spring and a meeting with Identity Inc. at Watkins Mill High School in Gaithersburg.

 

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Release ID: 16-152
Media Contact: Neil Greenberger 240-777-7939